Openly Gay Native American Wins Kansas Democratic Primary

Sharicee Davids, Kansas Democrat

Following a highly competitive Democratic primary election in Kansas, Sharice Davids joins a rising number of LGBTQ identifying candidates running in this year’s midterm elections, of which include Rep. Jared Polis and Kyrsten Sinema potentially becoming the nation’s first openly gay elected governor and first openly bisexual elected U.S. senator from any state, respectively.

However, there is much more to Davids than her queer identity expresses. Raised in a single parent home to a mother serving in the U.S. Army for more than 20 years, Davids ventures from “community college to the Ivy League, from a waitress to the White House” as she describes in her latest campaign video.

Defying odds and expectations for much of her life, the former mixed martial arts (MMA) fighter also belongs to Wisconsin’s Ho-Chunk Nation, and is a graduate of Johnson County Community College. Later earning a degree in business administration from University of Missouri-Kansas City and law degree from Cornell University, she soon chose to pursue a career in uplifting Native American and other marginalized communities through means of entrepreneurship and advocacy.

Her success and achievements later led her to become a White House Fellow during President Obama’s final and Trump’s first year in office. Her eventual decision to run for Kansas’ 3rd congressional district consequently coincides with witnessing the drastic transitions in presidential administrations.

Throughout her campaign, Davids prioritizes Medicaid expansion, womens rights and DACA protections despite running alongside more moderate Democrats and against four-time elected incumbent Republican Rep. Kevin Yoder.

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Winning her primary against another similarly positioned candidate endorsed by Sen. Bernie Sanders, Davids embodies the persona of the impassioned American citizen and underdog vocalizing the frustrations of fellow Americans concerned about the country’s direction and the consequent effects on their surrounding communities.

She continues to surprise those around her, even those worried she would not be able to win this primary as The Kansas City Star reports, and she now accompanies New Mexico's Deb Haaland to become the first Native American women elected to Congress.

“You told me you needed someone who lives your struggles. You told me you needed someone who listens when you speak. You told me you needed someone who knows your experience,” Davids says in a newsletter.

“You told me to run. You told me to win. And, together, we made history last night."

For more from Juaquin Robles, follow him on Twitter here.

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