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NYC's Oldest Gay Bar Considered for Historic Preservation

NYC's Oldest Gay Bar Considered for Historic Preservation

julius-bar.jpg

Julius' was the location of a historic protest three years before the Stonewall riots.

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo recently recommended Julius' in the West Village to the State and National Register of Historic Places, among 19 other locations. In a statement, Cuomo said:

"These landmarks are a part of our rich and storied history and helped define what it means to be a New Yorker. By placing these landmarks on the State and National Registers of Historic Places, we are preserving their legacies and ensuring that they will be enjoyed for generations to come."

If you're familiar with the Stonewall riots (you better be!), then hopefully you've heard of New York's oldest gay bar, Julius'--just a block away from Stonewall. Julius' was the location of a historic protest, three years before the Stonewall riots, in 1966. Back then, bars were prohibited to sell alcohol to gay men and lesbians because they were seen as "disorderly." In protest, three men sat at the bar of Julius', admitting they were homosexual and requesting to be served a drink.

Although Cuomo's recommendations still need to be approved by the state historic preservation officer and the National Register of Historic Places, Julius' is a perfect candidate and an important part of LGBT history.

Watch the video below to learn more about Julius':

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