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Step into the Out100 Vault & celebrate 30 years of history-making LGBTQ+ folks!
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Vault

Step into the Out100 Vault & celebrate 30 years of history-making LGBTQ+ folks!

It's been 30 years since the annual Out100 list started highlighting the best and brightest of the community. To honor that milestone, let's take a look back at the many LGBTQ+ people who have changed the world.

This year marks the 30th anniversary of the Out100, Out’s storied annual list of LGBTQ+ people who have changed culture — and the world.

In celebration of this milestone, we are so proud to launch the official Out100 Vault, which highlights the Out100 covers from our archive as well as fresh essays and insights from past honorees.

The preservation of the LGBTQ+ past has never been more important, as the recent right-wing attempts at queer book bans and censorship demonstrate. For over three decades, Out has fought against mainstream erasure, telling the stories of the artists, warriors, and changemakers who made our history and our movement. Looking to the future, we hope you find inspiration from them in the ongoing fight for visibility and equality.

And if you, or someone you know, deserve to be on this list, please let us know through the Reader’s Choice submission page. Your stories and accomplishments need to be heard, and Out as always is here to tell them.

Sincerely,


Daniel Reynolds

Editor in chief, Out Magazine

Raffy Ermac

Editor in chief, Out.com

See All 2023's Most Impactful and Influential LGBTQ+ People
Artists
Disruptors
Educators
Groundbreakers
Innovators
Storytellers
In 2015, Barack Obama showed us what it truly meant to be an ally
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In 2015, Barack Obama showed us what it truly meant to be an ally

Also honored in the Out100 were Dan Levy, Candis Cayne, Russell Tovey, Roxane Gay, and Cynthia Nixon.

Barack Obama, Ally of the year. When he was sworn into presidency on January 20, 2009, there were only TWO states where same-sex marriage was legal. By the end of the 44th president's second term, same-sex marriage was legal NATIONWIDE. From the historic legalization of same-sex marriage across the nation to the repeal of the "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy in the military, Obama's unwavering commitment to equality continues to resonate. Barack Obama continues his advocacy for equality and is a major supporter of President Joe Biden's campaign.

2015 was a massive, groundbreaking year for the LGBTQ+ community. Same-sex marriage became legal nationwide, progress was finally being made. The power was taken from the states and it forced the ugliest parts of America to see that love is LOVE. Turning over the marriage laws in 13 states, on the day thousands of couples rushed to get married, even in the most conservative towns across the country.

It was also a transformative year for trans visibility, as Laverne Cox was on the cover of TIME and Caitlyn Jenner came out on Vanity Fair's cover. Both making huge leaps for the trans community.

Although it was a year of progress for many, the climate created a lot of tension. In November, the attacks on Paris took the world by storm. A massive attack, with the loss of 103 lives and hundred other civilians wounded. Not too long after the attacks, Donald Trump became a frontrunner in the 2016 presidential election, causing more division in the country.

In 2015, LGBTQ+ media reached new heights of visibility and influence, with groundbreaking moments in television, film, and politics that explored the diversity of LGBTQ+ experiences.

Television saw the rise of trailblazing shows. Transparent, an Amazon Prime series created by Joey Soloway, The show centers around a family's journey after their patriarch comes out as a transgender woman, played by Jeffrey Tambor, won numerous awards, including a Golden Globe for Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy. Its portrayal of gender identity and family dynamics resonated with audiences and sparked important conversations about transgender issues.

Orange Is the New Black, the Netflix series that already made waves with its diverse cast and complex characters, continued to shine in 2015. The show featured several LGBTQ+ characters, including the groundbreaking representation of a transgender woman, Sophia Burset, played by Laverne Cox. Cox's performance and visibility furthered the conversation around transgender rights and representation in the media. Shows like Empire, Supergirl, Rosewood, The Royals, and Blindspot also showed incredibly fluid and diverse characters throughout the year.

In films, Carol directed by Todd Haynes stunned audiences with its portrayal of a romantic relationship between two women in the 1950s. Starring Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara, the film received critical acclaim and multiple award nominations, highlighting LGBTQ+ love stories. Also in the film genre, Eddie Redmayne had been nominated for an Academy Award for his performance in The Danish Girl. A biographical film inspired by the life of trans woman Lili Elbe.

Social media also played a pivotal role in LGBTQ+ media in 2015. YouTube and other digital spaces became important platforms for queer voices and stories. Content creators like Tyler Oakley, an out gay YouTuber, continued to grow their audiences, using their platforms to advocate for LGBTQ+ rights and share personal experiences. Additionally, the rise of web series such as Her Story, which focused on the lives and loves of trans women, showcased the power of social platforms in promoting underrepresented voices.

In music, out LGBTQ+ artists continued to make cultural contributions. Halsey, a bisexual singer-songwriter, released her debut album Badlands, which received commercial success. Her openness about her sexuality and mental health issues resonated with fans and added to the growing representation of LGBTQ+ individuals in the music industry.

2015 was a year of transformation, change and movements. A year that proved to be tough but also beautiful in many ways. With representation soaring in the press, in the government and in the media.

See All 2023's Most Impactful and Influential LGBTQ+ People
Artists
Disruptors
Educators
Groundbreakers
Innovators
Storytellers

Daniel Reynolds

Daniel Reynolds is the editor-in-chief of Out and an award-winning journalist who focuses on the intersection between entertainment and politics. This Jersey boy has now lived in Los Angeles for more than a decade.

Daniel Reynolds is the editor-in-chief of Out and an award-winning journalist who focuses on the intersection between entertainment and politics. This Jersey boy has now lived in Los Angeles for more than a decade.

Raffy Ermac

Raffy is a Los Angeles-based writer, editor, video creator, critic, and the digital director of Out.

Raffy is a Los Angeles-based writer, editor, video creator, critic, and the digital director of Out.