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Gia Gunn Confirms What We Knew — Her 'All Stars' Beef Was Fabricated

gia gunn

"I know what TV producers look for," she said of dust ups with Farrah Moan and Trinity the Tuck.

MikelleStreet

Gia Gunn is back and she has something -- ok, well at this point more -- to say.

On an episode ofHey Qween!, the RuPaul's Drag Race: All Stars season 4 competitor rehashed her experience on the show where she quickly became the Regina George of the cast. And though she didn't make it far on the series -- an endeavor in which she invested over $16,000 on looks, according to her -- she certainly left an impression placing herself at the center of workroom dramas. But now, she's admitting it was all for the cameras and, in hindsight, may have been ill-advised.

"Looking back it's like, yeah, ok, maybe I wish I didn't say or do certain things, but I'm not one of those queens who likes to live their life with regret," Gunn, who is working on a book, said in the interview. "I can honestly say I had a fear of being boring and the Gia Gunn that everybody lives for and gags for." So she leaned into her role as a villain -- a role she created on her own, not at the request of the show producers.

"To be honest, they didn't ask anything of me," she said when asked about producer input. "I think there were times where I felt in my heart, because I've done TV a couple of times and I know what TV producers look for." And excellent television it was.

Gunn went on, explaining that much of the money she invested into the show came from money she had saved and raised via GoFundMe for surgery. She even alluded to the now-infamous, but aso illusively reported, unaired workroom confrontation between she and Ru. While she didn't specify what happened, she did insinuate that the details would be included in the book she is writing. But what about the confrontations with Farrah Moan and Trinity the Tuck? We saw those!

"Girl that was all planned," she said of her altercation with Trinity over being Caitlyn Jenner for Snatch Game, which birthed the iconic line, "What you wanna do, is not necessarily what you're gonna do." Merchandise with that phrase will be coming soon.

According to Gunn, she and Trinity had an understanding that the fights were simply for story lines. They were plays at screen time, which both of them got in spades. Gunn had no such understanding with Moan. "That's where I made the mistake with Farrah," she said.

According to Gunn, she and Moan had an altercation months before the show and hadn't spoken since. But the day before their onscreen altercation, the two made up off camera in a heart-to-heart.

"The next day I go in, stir the pot, bullying her at her makeup station, and she's like, "What the fuck is happening here?'" Gunn explained. "So I should have done what I did with Trinity."

Of course that's not all the fresh tilapia talked about on the show. She also gave her thoughts on the double win of Monet X Change and Trinity (they were brutal) as well as the high-production Chilean drag competition The Switch Drag Race, which she appeared on for season 2.

RELATED | This Is the Queen That Won Alaska's Drag Queen of the Year Pageant

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Mikelle Street

Mikelle is the former editorial director of digital for PrideMedia, guiding digital editorial and social across Out, The Advocate, Pride.com, Out Traveler, and Plus. After starting as a freelancer for Out in 2013, he joined the staff as Senior Editor working across print and digital in 2018. In early 2021 he became Out's digital director, marking a pivot to content that centered queer and trans stories and figures, exclusively. In September 2021, he was promoted to editorial director of PrideMedia. He has written cover stories on Ricky Martin, Miss Fame, Nyle DiMarco, Jeremy O. Harris, Law Roach, and Symone.

Mikelle is the former editorial director of digital for PrideMedia, guiding digital editorial and social across Out, The Advocate, Pride.com, Out Traveler, and Plus. After starting as a freelancer for Out in 2013, he joined the staff as Senior Editor working across print and digital in 2018. In early 2021 he became Out's digital director, marking a pivot to content that centered queer and trans stories and figures, exclusively. In September 2021, he was promoted to editorial director of PrideMedia. He has written cover stories on Ricky Martin, Miss Fame, Nyle DiMarco, Jeremy O. Harris, Law Roach, and Symone.