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10 Queer Body-Posi IGs to Follow if You Loved Sam Smith’s Post

Body Positivity

Sam Smith’s Instagram post exposing his belly for the first time broke the internet. In the post, the Oscar-winning singer admitted to the problems he’s had accepting his own body and said that he “decided to fight the fuck back.”

That Smith’s Instagram became so popular shows that not only are many people struggling with their own narratives around their bodies, but they crave more people who are willing to talk about it. That’s where these queer folks come in.

Instagram has become an essential medium for queer people of all different bodies — fat queer people, disabled queer people, and more — to talk about their bodies while also countering what the mainstream media says about fatness, queerness and disability. Here are 10 queer Instagrammers you can follow to keep your feed a steady stream of body positivity.

Enam Asiama (@enamasiama)

Asiama is a Ghanaian-British self-proclaimed fat queer femme whose Instagram serves “fat haute couture as a fuck you to fast fashion,” per one of her IG posts. Not only does her profile contain several written affirmations about being a plus-size fashionista, but her high-fashion sartorial serves will make your jaw drop.

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

another year is passing, another year to be broke with expensive taste, getting the people gagging and serving fat haute couture as a fuck You to fast fashion. Sorry to interrupt also, but @afiyamia of @afiyamia.studio deserves the exposure, coins and space as an upcoming Afro-Caribbean designer. We must nurture, treasure and look out for her and support her as her brand continues to show allyship for plus size fashionistas. Mariana dos Santos Pires Designer: @afiyamia @afiyamia.studio Model: @enamassiama  #ewurajaja #afiyamia #designer #psblogger #fatfashion #fatgirljoy #couture #digitalinfluencer #influencer #fatgirlmagic #bodypositive #beach #goddess #selflove #travelnoire #travel #ukstyleblogger #goldenconfidence #curvygirlsrock #blacknatural #afro #wlyg #style #fashion #plussize #plussizemodel #model #BlackGirlMagic #photography #beauty

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Marquis Neal (@marquimode)

A vlogger and a model whose IG is full of lewks, Neal wears outfit after outfit that will make you ask, “Where did you get that?” His work has been featured in BuzzFeed and Huffington Post and he’s collaborated with clothing brand ASOS and the body-positive campaign, The Every Man Project.

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

gay dad goes to a picnic

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Ericka Hart (@ihartericka)

Hart self-identifies as a “kinky, poly, queer, cancer-warrior, activist, sexuality educator and performer,” according to Forbes. Diagnosed with bilateral breast cancer at the age of 28, she uses her Instagram to bring visibility to breast cancer survivors and destroy your preconceived notions about illness, Blackness, and queerness.

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Can’t remember the first time I saw a white person post a photo like this with the hashtag “thick/thicc” but I do know my blood pressure raised and confusion spiked. So on this day, during Black History Month, I’d like to remind everyone that thick/thicc belongs to black bodies. [This was originally posted in my stories and generated a lot of conversation/ white folks asking me for proof.] After watching the Grammys and seeing the literal erasure of black bodies/music - I figured I’d give this post a permanent spot- cause its all connected. Happy Black History Month! See stories if you have questions about the word thick being AAVE. #blackhistorymonth

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Shay Neary (@watchshayslay)

Shay Neary is the first plus-size transgender model to land a major fashion campaign and also regularly talks about desirability politics on her IG. “I’m a firm believer in experiencing your body, through sex, to learn how to appreciate it for yourself,” she wrote in a recent post. “That can include self-pleasure, partner play, group play, or even sex positive scenes.”

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

The great Mae West once said: . “Cultivate your curves - they may be dangerous but they won’t be avoided!” . The word cultivate, isn’t a word inherently used to describe bodies, but rather land... And nobody knows land, better than a hoe, and don’t you forget it! : @impishlee . I’m a firm believer in experiencing your body, through sex, to learn how to appreciate it for yourself. That can include self-pleasure, partner play, group play, or even sex positive scenes. . I used to be highly insecure during sex. No matter my comfort level with my partner, I could not escape the fear of judgment that I put upon my own body. I would disconnect during sex, almost abandoning my body, because I was so scared of what it was capable of. . When I hated myself, even the most enjoyable parts of my life, were disheartening. Even when a man, was telling and showing me how he felt about me, I only sensed disbelief. But then again, my idea of self worth, was selling my body to the highest bidder. . Sex after sex work; changed my perception of my body. I started enjoying intimacy for once, explaining how I liked things done, and being vulnerable enough to let someone cherish all of me. . Enjoying my body, relishing in its power, and analyzing my release. I let go of the things that didn’t matter, the things that were only holding me back from fully enjoying my body. . I started seeing my strength... . The fortitude that you can find, when you let down your walls of self doubt, can often overcome you. It’s dangerous, for sure, but entirely unavoidable in finding yourself. . My curves are cultivated, they’ve been fostered and cherished, and to be honest even well fed! . How are you cultivating your curves? . #selfworth #bopo #bodypositive #trans #transgender #fat #sexpositive #effyourbeautystandards #writersofinstagram #mybodymyrules #fatandfabulous #girlslikeus #transisbeautiful #wewontbeerased #lingerie #body #selflove #findingyourself #fatpositive #plusmodel #transmodel #model

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Nicolette Mason (@nicolettemason)

Nicolette Mason is the co-founder of Premme, a plus-size fashion line that was a hit from the day it launched. Their Instagram is something of a fashion diary that contains nothing but constant serves.

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Leveled up on Jewish Christmas. #halongbay #vietnam

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Mina Gerges (@itsminagerges)

If you’re a fan of Sam Smith’s stomach-baring post, then you’ll love Mina Gerges’s Instagram. Gerges’s feed is full of body-ody-ody, often shot in Instagram-ready locations.

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Swipe to read some of my interview with @cbcnews chatting about body positivity

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Annie Segarra (@annieelainey)
A disabled queer YouTuber and content creator, Segarra’s Instagram proves that she’s great, no matter the social media platform. On her IG, she regularly breaks down complicated questions around disability for her followers in an accessible way. And, oh yes, she slays while doing it.

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Yesterday I had a couple of instances that felt very #FakingWell; one where I walked without support and one where I used my cane. Someone asked me if using my cane felt better or worse than using my wheelchair and another asked if me walking (rather than using my wheelchair) meant that I was doing "better". The answers to those questions are both a little complicated. Q1: Overall, using my wheelchair is the safest and most comfortable way for me to move around, and the ONLY way I can move for long distances or periods of time. I use my cane in very specific settings, where it logistically feels easier for me to use it. Inaccessible spaces can include homes or large gatherings where even if a space is architecturally accessible, the event makes it difficult; if there is a large crowd, sometimes low lighting, I can have a difficult time navigating the space in my wheelchair, the crowds become a tremendous obstacle to getting around. I also have a lot of difficulty hearing people from down in my chair, so using my cane (which turns into a high seat in case seating in not available) allows for an easier experience in those regards. Q2: Technically I don't get "better", I will always have #EDS, but I do have some days or moments that are more stable than others. If I am using my cane, it means two things, that the specific environmental circumstances allow it and I don't have any current severe injuries, just pain and fragility. It takes a lot of work to be able to do it; I have to focus hard on my major joints like my ankles, knees, and hips. I have to concentrate on keeping my muscles tense in order to try and hold my legs together, this is uncomfortable, painful, and risky, I can only do it in short bursts. My wheelchair is the safest and least painful way for me to move around and a lot of spaces and circumstances make me feel like putting my body at risk is the ~easier~ option. Each mobility aid has it's pros and cons for me in regards to accessibility and the impacts on my body and experience. [Image Description: Annie sits in a seat from a monochrome living room set wearing a black jacket, two knees braces, and holding her cane.]

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Jessamyn Stanley (@mynameisjessamyn)

Stanley, a body-positive yoga instructor and author of Everybody Yoga regularly uses her Instagram to talk about what it means to practice health and wellness for techniques for any body of any size. And regardless of whether she’s in yoga pants or thigh high boots, she’s always serving.

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Lemme tell you a story of a Fat Girl who lost ~50 pounds from a combo of obsessively practicing advanced yoga postures, working in a hot+sweaty restaurant, drinking alcohol constantly, and skipping major meals. That same Fat Girl has changed big parts of her life- she stopped drinking all the time, stopped skipping major meals, started meditating more than obsessively practicing yoga postures, and exchanged her work in a hot + sweaty restaurant for a career that requires constant travel/emotional upheaval. That Fat Girl regained the weight she lost and, even though her life felt much more fulfilling, she still found herself wanting to feel more physically + nutritionally fit. So in the year of our lord 2018, that Fat Girl decided to focus on finding a new definition of healthy. She started lifting weights and intentionally practicing cardio + strength training. She learned about wheat belly and the benefits of veganism. She fell in love with @glutinofoods and @beyondmeat. She began juicing regularly and even made a @qapital savings goal specifically for the purpose of buying a masticating juicer. She slept more and drank lots of water every day and while she didn’t lose a lot of weight she felt much more balanced. She learned to love and honor her Fat identity, and in turn learned to love and honor her most true self. But at the same time that she was redefining wellness and nutrition for herself, that Fat Girl had to deal with a constant stream of well-intentioned nosy internet assholes who felt compelled to make assumptions about her health. She was not sure why these strangers felt they had the right to comment on her wellbeing- perhaps they were reflecting their own conditioned self-hatred on to her? Stop commenting on the lifestyles of people you don’t know. You are judging on the basis of internet curation and you look stupid as a result. The people you choose to judge are just as complicated as you. Instead of judging someone else, focus on moisturizing your spirit and minding your own business. Because, if we’re making judgements, your spirit looks ashy as fuck from this angle. Prince @justincookphoto took this picture #fbf #wellnessmyway

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Thaddeus Coates (@hippypotter)

A Black queer plus-size model and illustrator, Coates was recently seen sporting jeans in American Eagle's latest campaign. Aside from sharing photos from his photo shoots, Coates also shares his original art, which often depicts plus-size Black bodies. 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

OLIVE YOU

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Marfmellow (@gvcciana)

Popular Tumblr user Marfmellow also runs a popular Instagram where she regularly posts about everything she loves, whether it be gaming, Pokemon, or tarot. Alongside all this are some real nuggets of wisdom about body positivity and dealing with fat stigma.


 

 



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