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A Drag Queen Is Reporting Live From the Impeachment Hearings

A Drag Queen Is Reporting Live From the Impeachment Hearings

New Jersey drag artist Pissi Myles strode into today’s impeachment hearing in a tall blonde wig, shoulderless red dress, and eyeshadow so broad it nearly wrapped around her head.

However, Myles is not just there for spectacle. She’s covering the hearing for a news startup called Happs, which hasn’t officially launched yet but is currently in beta mode. When it launches, Happs says that it will offer breaking news covered in part by hobbyists instead of professional journalists.

“It’s a crazy day in Washington!” Myles told NBC News. “I’m flipping my wig over the high-energy proceedings today. Tensions are high, and the bar for who’s allowed in the Longworth House is very, very low.”

Her presence certainly elicited some arched eyebrows. “Someone did just ask me last night if there’s anything in D.C. that surprises me anymore,” tweeted NBC’s Heidi Przybyla.


Myles performs in New York and on Fire Island and can be heard on the podcast My Gay Spooky Family, but she claimed the hearings were a first for her. “This is the closest I’ve ever been to a situation like this,” Pissi said on the Happs livestream during a break in testimony. “Being amidst all the buzz here, you can see in the comments everyone is so divided. It’s the most polarizing political activity I’ve seen in a long time.”

“People are very interested in my shoes,” she added. “I’ve had several offers, and I may take them up on it if the Acela home is sold out.”

Polling shows that a slim majority of Americans are in favor of impeaching President Donald Trump as public hearings commence Wednesday. 

According to polling averages collected by FiveThirtyEight, 47.5 percent of Americans say that the president should either be impeached for his attempts to pressure President Vlodomyr Zelensky to dig up dirt on political rival Joe Biden. Although the original report cited a July 25 phone call between Trump and Zelensky, witnesses have alleged a months-long campaign to withhold foreign aid to Ukraine if its president did not comply with Trump’s request. 

But even if most Americans agree those allegations should result in the president’s ultimate impeachment, the country remains divided on the issue. 

Poll averages show 44.4 percent of respondents are not in favor of impeachment — which right-wing critics, including the president himself, have characterized as an attempt by Democrats to overturn the results of the 2016 election. 

During the livestream, Myles hoped that seeing her face in the room “brings a moment of levity” for Americans during a politically fraught era.

“And I hope this is a way of bringing younger people into this,” she said. “[…] It’s my first foray into the news business. Usually people try to snatch the microphone out of my hand instead of putting it there.”

RELATED | Why Trump’s Impeachment Matters to LGBTQ+ Americans

Tags: Politics, News

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