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Exclusive: Noah Galvin Directs First Music Video About the Relationship of 2 Queer Women

Noah Galvin

Noah Galvin, 24, has experienced being in front of the camera on ABC’s The Real O’Neals and on stage in the titular role of Dear Evan Hansen, and now, he can add director to his resume.

The younger Galvin directs his musician older brother, Yoke Lore (Adrian Galvin), in a music video for his song “Ride,” on Lore’s upcoming “Absolutes” EP. The video depicts a relationship between two queer women, and eventually, the destruction of said relationship. The couple has a funeral of sorts for their time together.

Related | 13 Queer Artists You Might Not Know About

I spoke with Noah Galvin on the phone about choosing the music video’s story, working with his brother, and what’s next for him.

Elana Rubin: How did you decide to depict a relationship between two queer women for this song’s video?

Noah Galvin: I’ve watched my brother for the past few years go through this arduous break up, which I think is something we can all relate to. A break up is something that doesn’t end cleanly; it’s drawn-out and emotionally exhausting for both parties. I was thinking of ceremonies or funerals or things that give a real end to something.

At first I thought of a viking funeral, but it wasn’t in our budget. I found a Roman funeral: They build a pyre, and on top, they put the body. They lay the body on a big piece of wood and they’d burn it. My brother has been the star of his videos, and I wanted to remove him from the video. I wanted to tell the story of another relationship – not one he was involved in. I was thinking, how far removed from a straight white boy can we get? It being pride month, and me being an out gay man, I thought, why don’t we tell this story of some queer love? I thought of telling this relationship between two women. We’re in a scary time in America right now, and people are fearful of making statements and telling stories they don’t have a place telling. At the same time, I thought of what kind of story I wanted to tell. We weren’t telling a story of the plight of a woman in America, not the story of a lesbian or queer women of color in America. We’re telling a universal story of a relationship that everyone can see themselves in.”

ER: How did you get into directing?

NG: This is my first foray into directing. I’ve been an actor professionally for the last 13 years of my life, and I moved to L.A. three years ago to be on a television show called The Real O’Neals on ABC, and I became really intrigued [with directing]. I fell in love with the camera. More and more, I’ve tried to soak up all the technical knowledge as possible. I have a good eye, and the tools for the creative part of directing. My mother was a director back in the day and she had a filmmaking company – directing has been in my blood. But it was a scary, daunting task.

ER: Why was it scary and daunting?

NG: Being the leader in any situation is scary. I think it’s even scarier when it’s your vision. As an actor, I have an easy job. On paper, it’s easy. I get to hide behind someone else’s words. I have a shield of some sort, a layer of protection. With directing, it’s all you. It’s your brain. Whatever the final product is, is gonna be is your vision. You gotta be really strong in your conviction.

ER: What was it like working with your brother on this project?

NG: It was the best. My brother and I have been best friends since I was born. He’s four years older than me. We slept in the same bedroom, in bunk beds, until we were 15. We’re very, very close. He called me and asked me to do it. I’m an actor, and he’s a musician – rarely do we get to cross paths. This was a beautiful little opportunity.

ER: Do you want to continue to direct?

NG: I do – I have the bug.

Watch Yoke Lore’s “Ride” directed by Noah Galvin here:

 

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