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Pharma-douche Martin Shkreli Says He Wish He Jacked Up AIDS Med Price More than 5,000%

Martin Shkrelli pharma protests

Here’s your Monday hate read. Turing Pharmaceuticals CEO, Martin Shkreli, who you may remember as the guy who who raised the price of a life-saving medication from $13.50 to $750, says he wished he raised the price even more.

"No one wants to say it, no one's proud of it, but this is a capitalist society, capitalist system and capitalist rules," said Shkreli on Thursday, during an interview at the Forbes Healthcare Summit.

"My investors expect me to maximize profits, not to minimize them, or go half, or go 70 percent, but to go to 100 percent of the profit curve that we're all taught in MBA class."

Daraprim, the medication in question, is used to treat the rare parasitic infection toxoplasmosis. It can cause blindness or death in pregnant women and patients fighting cancer or HIV.

The 32-year-old former hedge fund manager made the ire-inducing comments only a week after he weaseled out of a promise to lower the cost of the drug by the end of the year.

Luckily, the free market that Shkreli has such a hard-on for might be coming to the rescue: Imprimis Pharmaceuticals and Express Scripts have stated that they will sell capsules containing Daraprim's active ingredients, pyrimethamine and leucovorin, for only $1 a pill, according to New York Daily News

If you want an even bigger hate read, why not try The New York Times’ tin-eared profile of Shkreli, with the headline "Martin Shkreli, the Bad Boy of Pharmaceuticals, Hits Back." In it, the business writers make him sound like a libertarian firebrand (he did donate to the presidential campaign of Bernie Sanders, unless you forget), although they do call him out for acting like an "immature teenager," and letting us know that he has strange collecting habits, such as buying a credit card that was once owned by the Nirvana frontman Kurt Cobain. He also seems to be a big fan of Alan Turing, since his company is named after him and he collects Enigma decoding machines.

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