Lunch Date With Ted Allen

1.13.2008

By Out.com Editors

Judge, Top Chef (Bravo) and Iron Chef America (Food Network), host, Uncorked: Wine Made Simple (PBS). Author, The Food You Want to Eat: 100 Smart, Simple Recipes.

He opened her fridge to Out's snoopy staff and 'fessed up to his daily dish.

Day 1

BREAKFAST
Strong black coffee (Starbucks French roast)
Freshly squeezed orange juice
Homemade banana bread

LUNCH
Leftover Thanksgiving turkey sandwiches, toasted whole grain bread, Dijon mustard, mayo, Gruy're,
Lay's sour cream and onion potato chips (my guilty pleasure)
Dill pickles
Leftover Alsatian pinot gris (Trimbach)

DINNER
Graziella's Restaurant,
232 Vanderbilt Ave., Brooklyn
Thin-crust, wood-fired pizza with arugula and Parmesan
Salad of mixed greens, walnuts, and gorgonzola
Peroni beer

Day 2

BREAKFAST
Coffee
Orange juice
Toasted poppy-seed bagel with cream cheese
Fruit salad (honeydew melon, blackberries, cantaloupe, apples)

LUNCH
Restaurant Olea, 171 Lafayette Ave, Brooklyn
Savory Parmesan French toast topped with poached eggs, peas, scallions, pea shoots, avgolemono sauce
Patatas bravas
White Grand Marnier sangria

DINNER
Centro Vinoteca, 74 Seventh Ave., New York.
Warm duck salad with caramelized onions, Belgian endive, and pears
Sheep's milk ricotta sformato with artichoke caponata
Tortellini in brood-rabbit involtino stuffed with sausage and pinenuts
Hazelnut cake with Nutella mousse
Light Italian red wine

Our nutritionist says:
I would love to see Ted eating more home-cooked meals. Even the best restaurants don't always use quality unrefined oils or the best quality produce (although eating at these restaurants is certainly better than eating at Popeye's). Maybe Ted could trade places with one of the Top Chef contestants and run to the market, purchase some fresh, quality ingredients and whip up something truly amazing and nutrient-dense in 10 minutes. I'm also a little concerned about the vat of acid -- coffee and OJ -- he's washing the inside of his stomach with every morning. Unfortunately Ted eats the same breakfast most of my clients eat -- one loaded with caffeine and quickly used-up carbohydrates, starting the day off on the wrong foot in terms of blood sugar. Ted, where are your whole grains? What I do love about this diet is Ted's flagrant middle finger to the misguided idea of eating 'low fat.' We need fat. Our brains need fat. Bravo Ted for including a range of fruits, veggies, and whole and unprocessed foods, including saturated fats like butter, sausage, and whole milk cheese, which have loads of vitamin A and D, nutrients often lacking in many low-fat diets.

Coleen De Vol is a Brooklyn'based certified nutrition consultant (American Association of Drugless Practitioners) and founder of JustFeelGood.com.

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