The Gay Agenda

11.23.2008

By Joseph Hassan

Friday, November 28: The gay comedy Antarctica rolls out in New York City today, just in time for you to roll your turkey-stuffed self down to the theater (though you might want to roll into the gym first). The flick focuses on finding love in Tel Aviv, following gay siblings Omer (Tomer Ilan) and Shirley (Lucy Dubinchik) and their love interests. Omer, pushing 30, is distraught as he struggles to find himself -- and the man of his dreams. Meanwhile, his sister Shirley has found her dream woman but gets cold feet at the thought of settling down and relinquishing her lifelong dream of traveling to Antarctica.

Saturday, November 29: Get ready for your close-up of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater as Ailey's pioneering troupe celebrates its 50th anniversary this year. As part of that commemoration, the group has released Ailey Ascending: A Portrait in Motion, its book of photographs by Andrew Eccles, the award-winning photographer who shot the cover of The New York Times millennium issue. Eccles notes that he was granted 'unparalleled access' to the company, and his stunning portraits demonstrate that artistic freedom, capturing the talented dancers during performances and in behind-the-scenes moments. A selection of the shots are on display at Manhattan's June Kelly Gallery, open from 11:00 AM to 6:00 PM EST today. The exhibit runs through December 9.

Sunday, November 30: The contributions of Dusty Springfield, the British pop recording artist who epitomized 1960s glamour, are captured in Dusty: Queen of the Post-Mods, the new book from Oxford University Press. Springfield, characterized by her iconic (and big) peroxide-blond hair and ultra-heavy eyeliner, helped to champion the music of Motown and personified white soul. Later, in the 1980s, her collaboration with the Pet Shop Boys propelled her back to the top of the charts in the U.S. and U.K. In her new book, music historian Annie J. Randall examines the bisexual singer's place in 'post-modern' sixties pop music and her transcendence of social and artistic norms of the decade.

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